Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines
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Antique Ifugao Bulul Statue - Philippines

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A very old looking Ifugao Bulul statue from the Philippines. the seated figure looks as though it has spent a long time exposed to the weather, likely having been used to guard rice crops. A Bulul is a carved wooden figure used to guard the rice crop by the Igorot peoples of northern Luzon. The sculptures are highly stylized representations of ancestors, and are thought to gain power from the presence of the ancestral spirit. The Ifugao are particularly noted for their skill in carving bululs. Bululs are used in ceremonies associated with rice production and with healing. Creation of a bulul involves alwen bulol ritual by a priest to ensure that the statue gains power. The bulul is treated with care and respect to avoid the risk of the spirits of the ancestors bringing sickness. The figures are placed in rice granaries to bring a plentiful harvest. A large granary may need two bululs, and a wealthy noble may also have one or more bululs in his house. // Among highland peoples of the insular Southeast Asia, the Ifugao enjoy the rare distinction of becoming widely known not under some originally generic term for "[savage] mountaineer," but under their own name for themselves as mispronounced by their Christianized Gaddang neighbors: i-pugaw, "the people of the known earth." The Ifugao belong to a group of peoples inhabiting northern Luzon's Cordillera Central who are collectively known among Filipino lowlanders as "Igorots," a term that first appears in Spanish records as a label for mountaineers who came down to Pangasinan to trade gold. As these Igorots resisted Spanish colonial rule, acculturation, and Christianization for three centuries, the Spanish referred to them as infidels and fierce and independent tribes, distinguishing them from the indios, the tribute-paying, trouser-and dress-wearing, and church-going lowlanders.