Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base
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Antique Mughal Indian Bidriware Hookah Base

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Beautiful antique Bidriware Indian hookah base.

Made with an alloy of zinc and copper interplayed with sheets of silver. The design has persian / islamic influence was likely manufactured in Bidah, a northern town in India that would have been under Islamic control when it was made.

A very unique piece and great example pf Bidriware that looks great displayed on a shelve.

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Bidriware is a metal handicraft from Bidar. It was developed in the 14th century C.E. during the rule of the Bahamani Sultans. The term "bidriware" originates from the township of Bidar, which is still the chief centre for the manufacture of the unique metalware. Due to its striking inlay artwork, bidriware is an important export handicraft of India and is prized as a symbol of wealth. The metal used is a blackened alloy of zinc and copper inlaid with thin sheets of pure silver.

The origin of bidriware is usually attributed to the Bahamani sultans who ruled Bidar in the 14th–15th centuries. Bidriware techniques and style are influenced by Persian art. It was first brought to India by noted Sufi Khwaja Moinuddin Hasan Chisti in the form of utensils.[2] The art form developed in the kingdom that was a mix of Turkish, Persian and Arabic influences which were intermingled with the local styles and thus a unique style of its own was born. Abdullah bin Kaiser, a craftsman from Iran was invited by the Sultan Ahmed Shah Bahmani to work on decorating the royal palaces and courts.[2] According to some accounts, Kaiser worked with local craftsmen and the partnership resulted in bidriware under the rule of Ahmed Shah and his son Second Alauddin Bahmani. Along with local artisans, the art spread far and wide and was handed over to generations as time passed.