Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Bamana Brass and Wood Mask
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Bamana Brass and Wood Mask

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£70.00
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£70.00
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A vintage African mask from the Banama tribe of Mali. Unfortunately some damage to the mouth area. // The Bamana people adapted many artistic traditions. Artworks were created both for religious use and to define cultural and religious difference. Bamana artistic traditions include pottery, sculpture, weaving, iron figures, and masks. While the tourist and art market is the main destination of modern Bamana artworks, most artistic traditions had been part of sacred vocations, created as a display of religious beliefs and used in ritual. Bamana forms of art include the n’tomo mask and the Tyi Warra. The n’tomo mask was used by dancers at male initiation ceremonies. The Tyi Warra (or ciwara) headdress was used at harvest time by young men chosen from the farmers association. Other Bamana statues include fertility statues, meant to be kept with the wife at all times to ensure fertility, and statues created for vocational groups such as hunters and farmers, often used as offering places by other groups after prosperous farming seasons or successful hunting parties. Each special creative trait a person obtained was seen as a different way to please higher spirits. Powers throughout the Bamana art making world were used to please the ancestral spirits and show beauty in what they believed in.