Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword
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Dayak Mandau Headhunters Sword

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Beautiful Dayak Mandau Head-hunters sword with wooden sheath. Everything about this sword is of a very high quality and must have been made by an expert craftsman. I believe it dates from around the middle of the last century. The blade is embedded with a yellow metal which I think is gold. And there is a small figure tied to the shaft. There may have been a second blade at one time which shared the same sheath, a whittling knife, generally referred to as Pisau raut.

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The Dayak people of Borneo possess an indigenous account of their history, mostly in oral literature,[6] partly in writing in papan turai (wooden records),[7] and partly in common cultural customary practices.[8] Among prominent accounts of the origin of the Dayak people is the mythical oral epic of "Tetek Tahtum" by the Ngaju Dayak of Central Kalimantan; it narrates that the ancestors of the Dayak people descended from the heavens before moving from inland to the downstream shores of Borneo.[citation needed]

The independent state of Nansarunai, established by the Ma'anyan Dayaks prior to the 12th century, flourished in southern Kalimantan.[9] The kingdom suffered two major attacks from the Majapahit forces that caused the decline and fall of the kingdom by the year 1389; the attacks are known as Nansarunai Usak Jawa (meaning "the destruction of the Nansarunai by the Javanese") in the oral accounts of the Ma'anyan people. These attacks contributed to the migration of the Ma'anyans to the Central and South Borneo region.

The colonial accounts and reports of Dayak activity in Borneo detail carefully cultivated economic and political relationships with other communities as well as an ample body of research and study concerning the history of Dayak migrations.[10] In particular, the Iban or the Sea Dayak exploits in the South China Seas are documented, owing to their ferocity and aggressive culture of war against sea-dwelling groups and emerging Western trade interests in the 18th and 19th centuries.[11]

In 1838, British adventurer James Brooke arrived to find the Sultan of Brunei fending off a rebellion against his rule. Brooke aided the Sultan in putting down the rebellion, for which he was made Governor of Sarawak in 1841, being granted the title of Rajah. Brooke managed to suppress the twin practises of headhunting and piracy as practised by the Dayak in the region. Brooke's most famous Iban enemy was Libau "Rentap"; Brooke led three expeditions against him and finally defeated him at the Battle of Sadok Hill. Brooke had many Dayaks in his forces at this battle and famously said "Only Dayaks can kill Dayaks. So he deployed Dayaks to kill Dayaks."[12] Brooke became the centre of controversy in 1851 when accusations against him of excessive use of force against natives, under the guise of anti-piracy operations, ultimately led to the appointment of a Commission of Inquiry in Singapore in 1854. After investigation, the Commission dismissed the charges but the accusations continued to haunt him.[13] During his rule, Brooke suppressed an uprising by Liu Shan Bang in 1857 and faced threats from Sarawak warriors like Sharif Masahor and Rentap and managed to suppress them.[14][15]

During World War II, Japanese forces occupied Borneo and treated all of the indigenous peoples poorly – massacres of the Malay and Dayak peoples were common, especially among the Dayaks of the Kapit Division.[16] In response, the Dayaks formed a special force to assist the Allied forces. Eleven US airmen and a few dozen Australian special operatives trained a thousand Dayaks from the Kapit Division in guerrilla warfare. This army of tribesmen killed or captured some 1,500 Japanese soldiers and provided the Allies with vital intelligence about Japanese-held oil fields.[17]