Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope

Victorian Gravitational Brass Gyroscope

Regular price
£1,200.00
Sale price
£1,200.00
Regular price
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Unit price
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For sale, a large demonstration gyroscope on stand by W . Ladd of London.

This solid brass gyroscope is held in a U shaped frame from which a circular mount is attached. The mount holds the central rotor disc which is attached by a spin axis to the top and bottom and can be spun to high resolution by means of winding a string around the axis which is threaded through a small hole in the axis.

The U shaped frame has a shaft which sits freely in a solid brass base on which the makers name is engraved, "W. LADD, 31 CHANCERY LANE, LONDON.

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The name gyroscope was coined by the French scientist, Leon Foucault in 1852 as a result of his investigations into the rotation of the earth and the development of the ideas of the German scientist Johann Gottlieb Bohnenberger from 1817. The experiment was commonly used thereafter to show how a spinning rotor resists changes to its orientation due to the angular momentum of the wheel. A phenomenon also known as gyroscopic inertia or rigidity in space, gyroscopes have been central to development of navigational instruments.