Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife
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Vintage Nepalese Kukri Knife

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£110.00
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£110.00
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A Nepalese Kukri knife in good condition with leather sheath and two smaller knives. I believe that this is an ex service weapon dating from the second world war.

The sheath is unfortunately a bit damaged at the top where the Kukri has broken though at some point but otherwise is in good condition.

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The kukri (English: /kkri/)[2] or khukuri (Nepali: , pronounced [kukuri]) is a type of machete originating from the Indian subcontinent, and is traditionally associated with the Nepali-speaking Gurkhas of Nepal.[3] The knife has a distinct recurve in its blade. It serves multiple purposes as a melee weapon and also as a regular cutting tool throughout most of South Asia. The blade has traditionally served the role of a basic utility knife for the Gurkhas. The kukri is the national weapon of Nepal, and consequently is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army.[4]

There have been, and still are many myths surrounding the kukri since its earliest recorded use in the 7th centurymost notably that a traditional custom revolves around the blade in which it must draw blood, owing to its sole purpose as a fighting weapon, before being sheathed. However, they are frequently used as regular utility tools. Extraordinary stories of their use in combat by Gurkhas may contribute to this misconception.[5][6] The kukri, khukri, and kukkri spellings are of Indian English origin,[7][better source needed] with the original Nepalese English spelling being khukuri.[citation needed]